Agnostic views & images I like

Thoughts about things on the web

Archive for the ‘blogging’ Category

I am moving many new posts to Google Plus!

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Forums and Minerals, the new Internet tools

Image via Wikipedia

And here’s an explanation of why that is! Can you believe a song that tells you what Google Plus is and isn’t!

Thanx for the reference Guy Kawasaki!

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Written by BobG in Dalian & Vancouver

2011/08/10 at 16:26

I approve of some forms of nudity, even when I am the nude

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This candid view was clicked several years ago. I was hot-tubbing with my bud, Les Yamada, at his place on Vancouver Island, south of Nanaimo!

 

I posted this view elsewhere and some of my prudish friends objected that it revealed too much info!

Written by BobG in Dalian & Vancouver

2011/08/06 at 19:00

August 6, 1991 WWW was born

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Tim Berners-Lee: The World Wide Web - Opportun...

Image by Fräulein Schiller via Flickr

Click here for an excellent article from TNW!

I remember how is was then. I was living in Vancouver and had been there for about a year. As I recollect how things WWW were then it boggles my mind that we have come so far!

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Written by BobG in Dalian & Vancouver

2011/08/06 at 13:08

State of the Internet Now!

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Regional Internet Registries world map.

Image via Wikipedia

This blog is one of 152 million on the ‘Net.

Wow! I guess I can’t be surprised that I get so few daily independent views.

Click here for the infographic that tells the whole Internet numbers story!

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Written by BobG in Dalian & Vancouver

2011/07/16 at 04:54

How a “tweet” led me to an valuable article source

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Since this all worked so neatly for me, I thought is was worthwhile leaving a record of my own www experience.

I “follow” Winsom Tang on Twitter. He posted, from Digg, a link in Digg to an article by Matthew Ingram a respected Social Network pundit about “Linkedin vs. Facebook: Professional vs. Personal in the Identity Wars. This is a subject I have been curious about because of many posts I have seen in Linkedin lately about service upgrades.

Digg is a useful www aggregator since it tends to crawl sites like GigaOM, the source of the Ingram post. Digg provides a convenient icon link for a direct posting on Twitter. In this case Digg is an intermediary, Twitter the alerting gadget and GigaOM the article source.

Browsing a  bit around Digg I found this sweet YouTube with good music, good scenery and some entertaining trick bike riding!

I also found a link to this map of Facebook friendship connections! Guess what there are no Facebook friendship connections in China, or Central Africa!

Written by BobG in Dalian & Vancouver

2011/04/07 at 14:38

The Internet today

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Tim Berners-Lee: The World Wide Web - Opportun...
Image by Fräulein Schiller via Flickr

Ben Hammersley, at FT.com, gives this capsule description of the Internet profile today:

The internet has come a long way since Sir Tim Berners-Lee, the inventor of the world wide web, turned on the first web server in Geneva on Christmas day 1990. Today, 2bn people are online; 800m of them are on Facebook. Every minute, 24 hours worth of video is uploaded to YouTube. Google, a company founded only 15 years ago, has a market capitalisation just short of $200bn and a mission statement that it intends “to organise the world’s information and make it universally accessible and useful” – something no one thinks unlikely or even remarkable. We now bank, shop, communicate, work and date through the internet. The internet has come of age. It is as defining an achievement for humanity as the Enlightenment or the industrial revolution.

This article includes a review of three books that are longer reports on the state of the Internet, or SOI.

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Written by BobG in Dalian & Vancouver

2011/01/28 at 15:16

I love images that have some kind of drama attached!

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It’s a gigantic star, some 20 times the mass of our Sun, that has been knocked about in space by a neighboring supernova and here is the latest image capture from NASA files:

And here is its official description:

A huge star ejected from a binary system has been photographed slamming headlong through a barrier of cosmic dust, creating a shockwave that shines in brilliant yellow in infrared views.

The star, called Zeta Ophiuchi, is a stellar behemoth with about 20 times the mass of our sun and would be 65,000 times brighter if it weren’t surrounded by a thick blanket of dust. It is about 4 million years old and is 460 light-years away from Earth. The star is zooming through space at a whopping 54,000 mph (nearly 87,000 kph), according to NASA scientists.

NASA’s Wide-field Infrared Survey Explorer, called WISE, caught the massive star plowing through thick dust to create what scientists call a “bow shock” – a shockwave that precedes stars as they move through space much like the ripple raised by the front of a boat traveling through water.

I have attached a few related articles suggested by Zemanta.

These kinds of dramatic images are one of the most accessible aspects of astronomy that give NASA their best public image. But is it worth those big budgets?

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Written by BobG in Dalian & Vancouver

2011/01/26 at 16:37

The folly in the quest for perfection!

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Lee Smolin at Harvard University
Image via Wikipedia

Lee Smolin is a world class scientist and does his science in Canada. He recently reviewed a book by Marcelo Gleiser that has a highly suggestive title “A Radical New Vision for Life in an Imperfect Universe”. Here is a telling excerpt from that book selected by Smolin for his review:

It became clear to me that scientists and seekers of perfection from all walks of life have been courting the wrong muse. It is not symmetry and perfection that should be our guiding principle, as it has been for millennia….The science we create is just that, our creation. Wonderful as it is, it is always limited, it is always constrained by what we know of the world….We may search for unified descriptions of natural phenomena, and we may find some partial unifications along the way. But we must remember that a final unification is forever beyond our reach….The human understanding of the world is forever a work in progress. That we have learned so much, speaks well of our creativity. That we want to know more, speaks well of our drive. That we think we can know all, speaks only of our folly.

As I read those lines I couldn’t help thinking that he could be describing how religious authorities propose unified models for human morality. Surely the one constant here, human folly, applies as much in the scientific domain as in the moral.

Scientists seem to be ready to express humility in the face of human intellectual weakness. When will religious spokespersons do as much? Is it possible that religious authorities speak from a position of intellectual arrogance since they propose that they are the final judges on earth of the perfection of their vision of human life.

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This may explain why your personality hasn’t fit with your Zodiac sign

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Astrological signs
Image via Wikipedia

It turns out that until recently we have been offered Astrological explanations based on an inaccurate calculation of the dates used to identify our astrological sign  Check out this link for the explanation.

Most astrological “advice” seems to depend on the imagination of the individual offering that “advice”. Is there an Astrological authority? Well there may be one depending on how you feel about Astrology and what it offers. In an age when scientists can’t even agree whether or not Pluto is a planet, it’s hardly surprising that astrological calendars are now being recalculated.

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Written by BobG in Dalian & Vancouver

2011/01/13 at 18:42

China plays “military head games” with the US & others

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Obtained from the U.S. Naval War College repor...
Image via Wikipedia

A Reuters news item discusses future use of the Varyag, a medium sized hand me down aircraft carrier now docked in Dalian harbor. This kind of “news” about China’s naval plans must be sourced out of some part of the US Defence industry. After all, this semi-hulk has been in Dalian harbor for several years and is seen easily from Dalian roadways.

But the real military head games are being played elsewhere according to this link.

A new missile attack ship and on the ground evidence of a Chinese stealth fighter seem to get more visibility than the poor old Varyag.

Since “news” is often the leading edge of propaganda, it makes me wonder what is really going on here, especially since the US Secretary of Defence announced sizable military budget cuts this week. Whose “news” is this stuff!

During the “Cold War” there was lots of “news” about the imminence of Soviet military domination. Now we are being treated to “news” about China’s newly developed military capabilities. Is this just the latest version of “let’s frighten them so we can get our way”?

Since the US is and has been since WW II, the global paragon of flaunting its military toys, can it be surprising to anybody that China is now doing the same thing? When will India turn up in these military equipment annals?

One thing that seems encouraging is that a respected Taiwanese military analyst seems calm about all this “news”, calm but circumspect:

But for one top Taiwanese security analyst, rumors of the runway test and China’s other upgrades have already achieved their key objective: to mess with U.S. war planners’ heads.

“It’s a very effective deterrent on the minds of strategic planners in Washington,” said Lin Chong-Pin, a former Taiwan defense official who teaches strategy at Tamkang University. “The Chinese don’t have to do anything in the future. Their announcement has already thrown a monkey wrench in strategic planning for U.S. action in and around the Taiwan Strait.”

I live and work in Northeast China – Dongbei. So I tend to pay more attention to the Korean context. Taiwan Strait seems much farther away. But that’s little comfort in this age of ship and aircraft borne missiles!

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Written by BobG in Dalian & Vancouver

2011/01/08 at 18:09